Posted by: rusch | October 25, 2007

A place called school

This is my second time going for becoming a teacher and all I can say is that some things never change. For one thing, if anyone majoring in education with intentions of being a teacher did every last “research proven” method for scripting lesson plans, planning for reading instruction, or many of the other things the profs talk about, you would work no less then seventeen hours everyday not including the extra time that you would have put in on weekends and holidays.

Give me a break.

I worked in the public schools and know a thing or to about the load that teachers have and unfortunately they do not have the time that most certification programs lead their candidates to believe they will have once they exit their programs with the license and new jog with a school district. What they will find is that teacher work days and pre-planning will be consumed with meetings and they will be lucky if they have an hour or two at the end to get ready for the next day (honestly I don’t know how elementary teachers do it having to teach all academic content areas).

Realistically most teachers are trying to keep just one step ahead of their students. Most of what they do is day to day survival for the first few years until they get into rhythm and discover a teaching style that works for them and their students.

Another thing that they don’t tell you is that even if you apply all the interventions, even if you take the extra time to thoroughly explain and give opportunities to practice what is being taught, there is a large number of confounding variables that might stand in the way of students succeeding in school.

Well, those are some of my thoughts on teacher preparation programs. Any teachers out there have some thoughts?


Responses

  1. I don’t know how “official” of a teacher I am, but I agree. I think there are solid teaching principles out there that make someone a good teacher. Perhaps having a knowledge of extra techniques and ideologies that you could apply in-classroom for specific groups of students would be helpful. It would help a teacher cater their own teaching to meet the needs of the students.


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